purloinedinpetrograd:

A Harvard Woman Figured Out How To 3D Print Makeup From Any Home Computer, And The Demo Is Mindblowing

Grace Choi was at Harvard Business School when she decided to disrupt the beauty industry. She did a little research and realized that beauty brands create and then majorly mark up their products by mixing lots of colors.
[…]
Choi created her own mini home 3D printer, Mink, that will retail for $300 and allow anyone to print makeup by ripping the color code off color photos on the internet. It hooks up to a computer, just like a normal printer. [x]

this is it folks. the future is here, and apparently it is going to look goddamn beautiful.
view in high res

purloinedinpetrograd:

A Harvard Woman Figured Out How To 3D Print Makeup From Any Home Computer, And The Demo Is Mindblowing

Grace Choi was at Harvard Business School when she decided to disrupt the beauty industry. She did a little research and realized that beauty brands create and then majorly mark up their products by mixing lots of colors.

[…]

Choi created her own mini home 3D printer, Mink, that will retail for $300 and allow anyone to print makeup by ripping the color code off color photos on the internet. It hooks up to a computer, just like a normal printer. [x]

this is it folks. the future is here, and apparently it is going to look goddamn beautiful.

s-t-r-a-n-g-e-c-h-a-r-m:

Some author out there has been waiting their whole life to write that headline
view in high res

s-t-r-a-n-g-e-c-h-a-r-m:

Some author out there has been waiting their whole life to write that headline

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

HEYYYYY SHANICE!!!!!! GOOD FOR YOU!!!

Beauty of the Universe

neuromorphogenesis:

Nature working with ‘nurture’: insight into the “depression gene”
Depression is among the world’s most burdensome diseases, and is estimated to become the second leading cause of disease burden by 2020. Depression has been associated to a number of environmental factors, such as childhood abuse and neglect, or stressful events later in life. Genetic make-up has also been considered a vulnerability factor, since not everyone seems to react to stress and develop depressive episodes in the same way.
One of the “depression genes” – serotonin transportergene – has recently received much attention, since evidence suggests that polymorphism linked to the gene (5-HTTLPR) is related to elevated symptoms of depression following stressful experiences and, especially, childhood maltreatment.
The role of serotonin transporter gene in occurrence and persistence of clinical depression has now been established, however, other genes have also been suggested to play a part in stress-triggered depression. A recent study suggests one of them – brain-derived neurotrophic factor(BDNF) gene – could be a major factor in the onset of depression after stressful life events, such as divorce or death in the family.
BDNF protein is involved in the development and survival of neurons, as well as synaptic connectivity within the brain. Stress is thought to reduce BDNF levels in the brain, as such decreasing the function of limbic regions, such as hippocampus, involved in cognition and emotion processing. These changes are thought to manifest in depressive mood, which can be reversed by antidepressants.
A single nucleotide polymorphism(SNP) within BDNF gene is thought to be related to reduced BDNF activity, therefore contributing to genetic vulnerability to mental conditions, including mood disorders and depression. In fact, animal models show that a specific polymorphism of the gene is related to anxiety-related behavior under stress conditions, and a number of studies suggest a link between the SNP in question and impaired stress response.
A meta-analysis compiled data from a number of studies looking at the combined effects of BDNF polymorphism and stress in the development of depression, and found significant interaction between the two factors. Interestingly, childhood adversity only showed a trend towards BDNF-related depression, in contrast to serotonin transporter gene, which interacts significantly with stressful childhood events.
However, influence of other lifetime stressful events on depression seems to be moderated through BDNF polymorphism, emphasizing that predisposition to environment-provoked mental disorders is heritable. Interestingly, research shows that individuals with genetic vulnerability to stress and depression also benefit from positive events or simply lack of stress. Paradoxically, these individuals have significantly reduced likelihood of depression onset, much more so than those without such genetic make-up, providing they experience no severe stress.
Understanding the etiology of depression is crucial, since this disabling disorder takes a toll on individuals and the society. However, it is clear that genetic factors, particularly serotonin transporter and BDNF genes, play distinct roles in stress-induced depression and are related to early and late lifetime events, emphasizing the importance of both environment and inherited sensitivity in the development of the disease. view in high res

neuromorphogenesis:

Nature working with ‘nurture’: insight into the “depression gene”

Depression is among the world’s most burdensome diseases, and is estimated to become the second leading cause of disease burden by 2020. Depression has been associated to a number of environmental factors, such as childhood abuse and neglect, or stressful events later in life. Genetic make-up has also been considered a vulnerability factor, since not everyone seems to react to stress and develop depressive episodes in the same way.

One of the “depression genes” – serotonin transportergene – has recently received much attention, since evidence suggests that polymorphism linked to the gene (5-HTTLPR) is related to elevated symptoms of depression following stressful experiences and, especially, childhood maltreatment.

The role of serotonin transporter gene in occurrence and persistence of clinical depression has now been established, however, other genes have also been suggested to play a part in stress-triggered depression. A recent study suggests one of them – brain-derived neurotrophic factor(BDNF) gene – could be a major factor in the onset of depression after stressful life events, such as divorce or death in the family.

BDNF protein is involved in the development and survival of neurons, as well as synaptic connectivity within the brain. Stress is thought to reduce BDNF levels in the brain, as such decreasing the function of limbic regions, such as hippocampus, involved in cognition and emotion processing. These changes are thought to manifest in depressive mood, which can be reversed by antidepressants.

single nucleotide polymorphism(SNP) within BDNF gene is thought to be related to reduced BDNF activity, therefore contributing to genetic vulnerability to mental conditions, including mood disorders and depression. In fact, animal models show that a specific polymorphism of the gene is related to anxiety-related behavior under stress conditions, and a number of studies suggest a link between the SNP in question and impaired stress response.

A meta-analysis compiled data from a number of studies looking at the combined effects of BDNF polymorphism and stress in the development of depression, and found significant interaction between the two factors. Interestingly, childhood adversity only showed a trend towards BDNF-related depression, in contrast to serotonin transporter gene, which interacts significantly with stressful childhood events.

However, influence of other lifetime stressful events on depression seems to be moderated through BDNF polymorphism, emphasizing that predisposition to environment-provoked mental disorders is heritable. Interestingly, research shows that individuals with genetic vulnerability to stress and depression also benefit from positive events or simply lack of stress. Paradoxically, these individuals have significantly reduced likelihood of depression onset, much more so than those without such genetic make-up, providing they experience no severe stress.

Understanding the etiology of depression is crucial, since this disabling disorder takes a toll on individuals and the society. However, it is clear that genetic factors, particularly serotonin transporter and BDNF genes, play distinct roles in stress-induced depression and are related to early and late lifetime events, emphasizing the importance of both environment and inherited sensitivity in the development of the disease.

Friendly reminder!

irresistible-revolution:

Science is not inherently more valuable than art

The strict separation of science and art is one that’s invested in white male colonial power relations

Also some of the world’s greatest scientists were artists as well (hello Da Vinci)

The popular definition of ‘science’ is embedded in colonial institutions.

Emotional intelligence is NEVER less valuable than scientific reasoning

Also everything that ‘scientists’ have accomplished would be impossible without all the people who work to provide human comfort: people like cooks and cleaners and musicians and artists and interior decorators.

Also, capitalism is viciously invested in colonizing both science AND art so can we just rise above these petty schoolyard disputes and work together to, like, idk, take back our education system?

bloggish:

how the hell did we get the idea pink isn’t a cool colour

because scientifically speaking pink doesn’t even exist; it fits between violet and red on the spectrum but actually what goes there is infrared and ultraviolet and all those things we can’t see

pink is the ambassador of an otherworldly and unknowable realm it is the most badass colour out there

particleb0red:

wildcat2030:

Many people can recall reading at least one cherished story that they say changed their life. Now researchers at Emory University have detected what may be biological traces related to this feeling: Actual changes in the brain that linger, at least for a few days, after reading a novel.

Their findings, that reading a novel may cause changes in resting-state connectivity of the brain that persist, were published by the journal Brain Connectivity. “Stories shape our lives and in some cases help define a person,” says neuroscientist Gregory Berns, lead author of the study and the director of Emory’s Center for Neuropolicy. “We want to understand how stories get into your brain, and what they do to it.” His co-authors included Kristina Blaine and Brandon Pye from the Center for Neuropolicy, and Michael Prietula, professor of information systems and operations management at Emory’s Goizueta Business School. Neurobiological research using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has begun to identify brain networks associated with reading stories. Most previous studies have focused on the cognitive processes involved in short stories, while subjects are actually reading them as they are in the fMRI scanner. The Emory study focused on the lingering neural effects of reading a narrative. Twenty-one Emory undergraduates participated in the experiment, which was conducted over 19 consecutive days. All of the study subjects read the same novel, “Pompeii,” a 2003 thriller by Robert Harris that is based on the real-life eruption of Mount Vesuvius in ancient Italy. “The story follows a protagonist, who is outside the city of Pompeii and notices steam and strange things happening around the volcano,” Berns says. “He tries to get back to Pompeii in time to save the woman he loves. Meanwhile, the volcano continues to bubble and nobody in the city recognizes the signs.”

directory or something

i really am just a dork with a blog, a perpetually loudmouth nobody with too many opinions, and uninteresting at that. but if you want to see more for whatever reason: these are some of the babes i love & my major sideblogs.